Accepted Posters

Title
A Type System for Safe Intermittent Computing
SRC
Media Attached
Automating NISQ Application Design with Meta Quantum Circuits with Constraints (MQCC)
SRC
Media Attached
Control Logic Synthesis Using Formal ISA Specifications
SRC
Media Attached
Coupled Applicative Functors
SRC
Media Attached
Finding Good Generators with Multi-Armed Bandits
SRC
Media Attached
Impacts of Range Reduction on Polynomial Approximation Efficiency
SRC
Media Attached
Multi-Phase Invariant Synthesis
SRC
Media Attached
Path Alignment Automata are Probabilistic Couplings
SRC
Media Attached
PBUnit: A Live Programming Environment for Unit Testing
SRC
Media Attached
Program Synthesis for Processor Development Using Formal Specifications
SRC
Media Attached
Visualization with Refinement Types
SRC
Media Attached

Call for Student Research Competition Submissions

The Student Research Competition (SRC) at PLDI allows students to present their research and get feedback from prominent members of the programming language research community. It’s an opportunity for students to network, practice presentation skills, and showcase their work. PLDI invites students (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) to submit their research.

We acknowledge that the past several years have been difficult for conference organization. As a community, we have worked together to implement various options for remote accessibility. We have found different formats have had different positive and negative components. For fully virtual conferences, we have missed seeing our friends and colleagues in person; on the other hand, for virtual conferences, we have enjoyed seeing more participation globally. However, many have found that a hybrid format inhibits engagement from all participants (remote and in-person). The Student Research Competition (SRC) at PLDI 2022 aims to incorporate the positive components (increased accessibility) while mitigating the negative components (limited engagement).

To that end, we are excited to pilot a two-track PLDI SRC this year.

Two-Track SRC Model

This model comprises of two pools of submissions: (1) students who present their work primarily in-person, and (2) students who present their work primarily virtually. To aid with planning, students should select one of the tracks at submission time; however, due to the volatility of public health guidelines/restrictions, this year, students will be able to change their track after the submission.

Our hope is that the virtual track will allow more students to participate, regardless of travel restrictions or monetary constraints. However, we will note that virtual participants may have limited access to the rest of the conference depending on how the different programs are offered (e.g., if they are streamed or not). Thus, in-person attendees will likely be able to engage with the wider conference, and attendees, more fully.

Note that the selection criterion of the Student Research Competition is not dependent on the mode of presentation. All students will be evaluated according to the same criteria.

Submission

The main body of the submission is a title and extended abstract consisting of the following:

Problem and Motivation: Clearly state the problem being addressed and explain the reasons for seeking a solution to this problem.

Background and Related Work: Describe the specialized (but pertinent) background necessary to appreciate the work in the context of PLDI areas of interest. Include references to the literature where appropriate, and briefly explain where your work departs from that done by others.

Approach and Uniqueness: Describe your approach in addressing the problem and clearly state how your approach is novel.

Results and Contributions: Clearly show how the results of your work contribute to programming language design and implementation in particular and to computer science in general; explain the significance of those results.

The final submission must also include the student author’s name, email address, institutional affiliation, research advisor’s name(s), ACM student member number, category (undergraduate or graduate), and mode of presentation (in-person or virtual). We recommend including all this information in the standard author contact information region.

Submissions must be original research that is not already published at PLDI or another conference or journal. One of the goals of the SRC is to give students feedback on ongoing, unpublished work. Furthermore, the abstract must be authored solely by the student. If the work is collaborative with others and/or part of a larger group project, the abstract should make clear what the student’s role was and should focus on that portion of the work.

The extended abstract must not exceed 1000 words and must not be longer than 2 pages. Reference lists do not count towards these limits.

When you’re ready, submit your extended abstract at the submission site: https://pldi22src.hotcrp.com/.

Should you have any questions on if your work is a good fit for the SRC track, please reach out to the SRC Co-Chairs.

Presentation and Attendance

Students accepted to the SRC based on their extended abstracts will proceed to the Poster (pre-Finale) Round. For the Poster Round, students must submit:

  • a research poster to present at PLDI,
  • a 5-minutes pre-recorded talk

In the two-track SRC model, the in-person track will be formatted as a traditional SRC: there will be an in-person poster session for three hours, in which PLDI attendees and in-person judges can walk around and interact with the students. The virtual track will be held in a virtual space that will be available to all PLDI attendees. In addition, we will have a pool of virtual judges that will walk around and interact with the virtual students. For some cross-over, we will organize for a TV in the in-person session, which will rotate through the virtual posters.

The top three undergraduate participants and the top three graduate participants (selected across both the virtual and in-person tracks) will proceed to the Final Presentation Round. The final round of SRC will be conducted in a conference room where in-person finalists will first present (streamed over Zoom), and virtual finalists will present via Zoom. Both the virtual and in-person judges/attendees will get a chance to ask questions during the Q&A session after each talk.

Participation

The Student Research Competition (SRC) at PLDI has always strived to improve engagement and accessibility to students around the world. To this aim, we will provide the opportunity for a round of asynchronous peer-review discussions amongst the SRC participants. The peer-review process is an opportunity for the SRC speakers to share their feedback, ask questions to their fellow peers, and help them make improvements for the poster and presentation round. This is also an opportunity for in-person and virtual speakers to engage prior to the SRC poster round.

We hope to utilize our experiences over the last two years to enable sufficient engagement in both tracks. We will work to provide tooling support, organization, and publicity to ensure all participants have a positive experience.

Good luck, and we hope to see you in June!

2022 PLDI SRC Winners

Graduate Track

  1. Gold: “A Type System for Safe Intermittent Computing” by Milijana Surbatovich
  2. Silver: “Program Synthesis for Processor Development Using Formal Specifications” by Zachary D. Sisco
  3. Bronze: “Finding Good Generators with Multi-Armed Bandits” by Joseph W. Cutler

Dates
Plenary
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Wed 15 Jun

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09:00 - 10:10
Keynote: Emery BergerPLDI at Kon-Tiki +12h
Chair(s): Isil Dillig University of Texas at Austin
09:00
10m
Other
Welcome to PLDI 2022
PLDI
Isil Dillig University of Texas at Austin, Ranjit Jhala University of California at San Diego; Amazon Web Services
09:10
60m
Keynote
Getting Your Research Adopted
PLDI
Emery D. Berger University of Massachusetts Amherst
Pre-print Media Attached
17:30 - 19:00
Student Research Competition (SRC) Session and ReceptionSRC at Beach North
17:30
90m
Poster
Control Logic Synthesis Using Formal ISA Specifications
SRC
Benjamin Darnell University of California, Santa Barbara
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Coupled Applicative Functors
SRC
Lisa Vasilenko IMDEA Software Institute
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Program Synthesis for Processor Development Using Formal Specifications
SRC
Zachary Sisco UC Santa Barbara
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Path Alignment Automata are Probabilistic Couplings
SRC
Qian Meng Cornell university
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Multi-Phase Invariant Synthesis
SRC
Daniel Riley Florida State University
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Finding Good Generators with Multi-Armed Bandits
SRC
Joseph W. Cutler University of Pennsylvania
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Impacts of Range Reduction on Polynomial Approximation Efficiency
SRC
Sehyeok Park Rutgers University
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Automating NISQ Application Design with Meta Quantum Circuits with Constraints (MQCC)
SRC
Haowei Deng University of Maryland at College Park
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
A Type System for Safe Intermittent Computing
SRC
Milijana Surbatovich Carnegie Mellon University
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
PBUnit: A Live Programming Environment for Unit Testing
SRC
Justin Du University of California, San Diego, Mandeep Syal University of California, San Diego, Thanh-Nha Tran University of California, San Diego
Media Attached
17:30
90m
Poster
Visualization with Refinement Types
SRC
Junrui Liu University of California, Santa Barbara
Media Attached
18:00 - 19:00
PLDI 2022 ReceptionPLDI at Beach North
18:00
60m
Social Event
PLDI 2022 Reception (sponsored by WhatsApp by Meta)social
PLDI

21:00 - 22:10
Keynote: Emery BergerPLDI at Kon-Tiki
21:00
10m
Other
Welcome to PLDI 2022
PLDI
Isil Dillig University of Texas at Austin, Ranjit Jhala University of California at San Diego; Amazon Web Services
21:10
60m
Keynote
Getting Your Research Adopted
PLDI
Emery D. Berger University of Massachusetts Amherst
Pre-print Media Attached

Thu 16 Jun

Displayed time zone: Pacific Time (US & Canada) change

09:00 - 10:10
Keynote: Margo SeltzerPLDI at Kon-Tiki +12h
Chair(s): Ranjit Jhala University of California at San Diego; Amazon Web Services
09:00
10m
Other
The PLDI Song
PLDI
John Wickerson Imperial College London, Alastair F. Donaldson Imperial College London
09:10
60m
Keynote
Imposter Syndrome, Stupid Questions, and Eight (+/-2) Problems I Need your Help With
PLDI
Margo Seltzer University of British Columbia
10:30 - 11:50
Student Research Competition (SRC) Finals SessionSRC at Rousseau East
21:00 - 22:10
Keynote: Margo SeltzerPLDI at Kon-Tiki
21:00
10m
Other
The PLDI Song
PLDI
John Wickerson Imperial College London, Alastair F. Donaldson Imperial College London
21:10
60m
Keynote
Imposter Syndrome, Stupid Questions, and Eight (+/-2) Problems I Need your Help With
PLDI
Margo Seltzer University of British Columbia

The ACM Student Research Competition (SRC) offers a unique forum for undergraduate and graduate students to present their original research on programming language design, implementation, theory, applications, and performance at PLDI 2022. The goal is to give students a place to discuss their research with experts in their field and to help them sharpen their research and communication skills.

Two-track Format

This year we are excited to pilot a two-track model, which encourages both in-person and remote participation. Please see the “Two-track Format” tab above for more details.

Rounds

Three rounds of competition will take place before and during PLDI 2022. All rounds are held in two categories: Undergraduate Students and Graduate Students. (Master’s and Ph.D. students both participate in the Graduate category.) Winners of the third round will be invited to participate in the SRC Grand Finals competition hosted by the ACM. The PLDI rounds are:

  • Extended abstract round. Students at the undergraduate and graduate level are encouraged to submit an extended abstract outlining their research.

  • Poster session. Based on the abstracts, a panel of judges will select the most promising authors to participate in the poster session, which will take place at PLDI. In the poster session, students will have the opportunity to present their work to the judges, who will select a group of semi-finalists in each category to advance to the next round. The exact format will be finalized closer to the event, but we plan to have two tracks: one virtual and one in-person. We hope to provide a rich environment for students from around the world to engage with each other and with senior experts in the field.*

  • PLDI presentation. The last round consists of a short oral presentation at the conference (across both virtual and in-person participants), to compete for the three top places.

Eligibility criteria

Participants must have current student status, either graduate or undergraduate, at the time of the submission deadline. Participants in the SRC must also be current ACM (student) members.

SRC Submissions

PLDI invites students to participate in the Student Research Competition in order to present their research and get feedback from prominent members of the programming language research community.

Each submission should include the student author’s name and email address; institutional affiliation; research advisor’s name; ACM student member number; category (undergraduate or graduate); research title; and an extended abstract addressing the following:

Problem and Motivation: Clearly state the problem being addressed and explain the reasons for seeking a solution to this problem.

Background and Related Work: Describe the specialized (but pertinent) background necessary to appreciate the work in the context of PLDI areas of interest. Include references to the literature where appropriate, and briefly explain where your work departs from that done by others.

Approach and Uniqueness: Describe your approach in addressing the problem and clearly state how your approach is novel.

Results and Contributions: Clearly show how the results of your work contribute to programming language design and implementation in particular and to computer science in general; explain the significance of those results.

Submissions must be original research that is not already published at PLDI or another conference or journal. One of the goals of the SRC is to give students feedback on ongoing, unpublished work. Furthermore, the abstract must be authored solely by the student. If the work is collaborative with others and/or part of a larger group project, the abstract should make clear what the student’s role was and should focus on that portion of the work.

The extended abstract must not exceed 1,000 words and must not be longer than 2 pages. Reference lists do not count towards these limits.

For more details, see the “Call for Extended Abstract Submissions” tab above.

Resources

Prizes

Winners of the three top places in each category receive prizes of $500 for the first place winner, $300 for the second place winner and $200 for the third place winner, respectively.

The top three undergraduate and graduate winners receive an award medal and a one-year complimentary ACM student membership with a subscription to ACM’s Digital Library.

ACM SRC Grand Finals

First place winners in each category will be invited to participate in the ACM SRC Grand Finals, an online round of competition between first-place SRC winners from different ACM conferences held in 2022. Grand Finals will be judged by an ACM-appointed panel of judges.

Winners of the three top Grand Finals places in each category will receive additional prizes of $500 for the first place winner, $300 for the second place winner and $200 for the third place winner, respectively. They will be also invited to the annual ACM Award Banquet along with prestigious ACM award winners, including the winner of the Turing Award.

As detailed on the Two-track Format page, this year we will be piloting a two-track model, which encourages both in-person and remote participation. The remainder of this page describes the expected format of the extended abstract submission, which is the same regardless of the intended mode of participation (in-person or remote).

Submitting

The main body of the submission is a title and extended abstract consisting of the following:

Problem and Motivation: Clearly state the problem being addressed and explain the reasons for seeking a solution to this problem.

Background and Related Work: Describe the specialized (but pertinent) background necessary to appreciate the work in the context of PLDI areas of interest. Include references to the literature where appropriate, and briefly explain where your work departs from that done by others.

Approach and Uniqueness: Describe your approach in addressing the problem and clearly state how your approach is novel.

Results and Contributions: Clearly show how the results of your work contribute to programming language design and implementation in particular and to computer science in general; explain the significance of those results.

The final submission must also include the student author’s name, email address, institutional affiliation, research advisor’s name(s), ACM student member number, and category (undergraduate or graduate). Please also include a sentence at the end stating whether you intend to attend remote or in-person.

Submissions must be original research that is not already published at PLDI or another conference or journal. One of the goals of the SRC is to give students feedback on ongoing, unpublished work. Furthermore, the abstract must be authored solely by the student. If the work is collaborative with others and/or part of a larger group project, the abstract should make clear what the student’s role was and should focus on that portion of the work.

Please use the ACM Conference Proceedings Template found here https://www.overleaf.com/read/yggzbgjwjntv with line numbers turned on.

The extended abstract must not exceed 1,000 words and must not be longer than 2 pages. Reference lists do not count towards these limits.

Once you’re ready, submit your document at the submission site: TBA

Good luck, and we hope to see you in June!

The Student Research Competition (SRC) at PLDI allows students to present their research and get feedback from prominent members of the programming language research community. It’s an opportunity for students to network, practice presentation skills, and showcase their work. PLDI invites students (both at the graduate and undergraduate level) to submit their research.

We acknowledge that the past several years have been difficult for conference organization. As a community, we have worked together to implement various options for remote accessibility. We have found different formats have had different positive and negative components. For fully virtual conferences, we have missed seeing our friends and colleagues in person; on the other hand, for virtual conferences, we have enjoyed seeing more participation globally. However, many have found that a hybrid format inhibits engagement from all participants (remote and in-person). The Student Research Competition (SRC) at PLDI 2022 aims to incorporate the positive components (increased accessibility) while mitigating the negative components (limited engagement).

To that end, we are excited to pilot a two-track PLDI SRC this year.

Two-Track SRC Model

This model comprises of two pools of submissions: (1) students who present their work primarily in-person, and (2) students who present their work primarily virtually. To aid with planning, students should select one of the tracks at submission time; however, due to the volatility of public health guidelines/restrictions, this year, students will be able to change their track after the submission.

Our hope is that the virtual track will allow more students to participate, regardless of travel restrictions or monetary constraints. However, we will note that virtual participants may have limited access to the rest of the conference depending on how the different programs are offered (e.g., if they are streamed or not). Thus, in-person attendees will likely be able to engage with the wider conference, and attendees, more fully.

Note that the selection criterion of the Student Research Competition is not dependent on the mode of presentation. All students will be evaluated according to the same criteria.

Presentation and Attendance

Students accepted to the SRC based on their extended abstracts will proceed to the Poster (pre-Finale) Round. For the Poster Round, students must submit:

  • a research poster to present at PLDI,
  • a 5-minutes pre-recorded talk

In the two-track SRC model, the in-person track will be formatted as a traditional SRC: there will be an in-person poster session for three hours, in which PLDI attendees and in-person judges can walk around and interact with the students. The virtual track will be held in a virtual space that will be available to all PLDI attendees. In addition, we will have a pool of virtual judges that will walk around and interact with the virtual students. For some cross-over, we will organize for a TV in the in-person session, which will rotate through the virtual posters.

The top three undergraduate participants and the top three graduate participants (selected across both the virtual and in-person tracks) will proceed to the Final Presentation Round. The final round of SRC will be conducted in a conference room where in-person finalists will first present (streamed over Zoom), and virtual finalists will present via Zoom. Both the virtual and in-person judges/attendees will get a chance to ask questions during the Q&A session after each talk.

Participation

The Student Research Competition (SRC) at PLDI has always strived to improve engagement and accessibility to students around the world. To this aim, we will provide the opportunity for a round of asynchronous peer-review discussions amongst the SRC participants. The peer-review process is an opportunity for the SRC speakers to share their feedback, ask questions to their fellow peers, and help them make improvements for the poster and presentation round. This is also an opportunity for in-person and virtual speakers to engage prior to the SRC poster round.

We hope to utilize our experiences over the last two years to enable sufficient engagement in both tracks. We will work to provide tooling support, organization, and publicity to ensure all participants have a positive experience.

Good luck, and we hope to see you in June!